Hear From Voters Like You.

Phoebe

Dekalb County

I am a U.S. citizen and was born in New York. Both of my parents and all of my grandparents were also born in the United States. I went to vote on November 6, 2018 at my polling place in DeKalb County, but was told by a poll worker that they could not confirm that I was a U.S. citizen. At the time, I had three different forms of ID: my drivers license from Massachusetts, my U.S. passport card and my Emory University ID. I was not allowed to vote with a regular ballot. I was forced to vote with a provisional ballot but was not provided with a receipt nor told that I needed to follow up on my ballot. Instead, I was assured that my vote would be counted.

When I visited the DeKalb County voter registration office on November 9, as required, the representative first told me she couldn’t help me because I didn’t have the documents or receipt that I was supposed to have been given when I completed my provisional ballot. I then asked her to check on my citizenship status, and gave her my forms of ID. She took a photocopy of my U.S. passport card and said I was all set. As of November 12, to the best of my knowledge, my registration had not been cleared, nor had my provisional ballot been counted.


Jamie

Fulton County

I have lived at the same address in Fulton County since April 1991, paying state taxes. I have not moved. I have not changed my address. Although I am not a regular voter, I believe I voted for Obama in 2012, and I am certain that I voted in the Presidential election in 2008.

On Election Day, I went to my designated polling location. The elections officials told me that they could not find me on the registered voter rolls. The poll workers searched their print outs as well as their digital database and were unable to find my voter registration.

The elections staff was friendly and provided additional information on the issue. A supervisor informed me that if I had not voted in the last 10 years, I was likely “scrubbed” from the voter registration rolls. It was troubling that the staff did not have any record that I had ever voted. They should at least know that I am a resident of the area and formerly registered to vote.

I was given a provisional ballot. I cannot remember if they offered the provisional ballot or if I requested it. I believe I am registered as a Democrat. The precinct and polling location is highly Democratic, I question if this had something to with being removed from the rolls.


Dasia

Fulton County

I planned to vote before work on November 6, 2018 at the Webster County EMS Building. I gave my ID to poll worker to scan an she informed me that I was Registered in Muskogee County and was supposed to be voting in Columbus. I have never lived in Muskogee County or Columbus. The address that the poll worker said was coming up in her system for me was incorrect. I was told that I could not vote in Webster County and I was not offered a Provisional Ballot. Columbus is a 45 minute drive and I had to report to work so I was unable to drive there to vote at that time and I didn’t finish working on November 6, 2018 until 10:00pm.


Talisha

Gwinnett County

In 2016 I registered to vote and my polling location was “Anderson Living.” At a later point, I received a letter notification that my new polling location was “Annistown Baptist.” I then received a second letter stating that my polling location was switched back to “Anderson Living.” A few days before Election Day I received a 3rd and final letter that my polling location would be at “Lenora Church.”

On Election Day in 2016, I ended up voting at Lenora Church. Between the presidential and this election, I did not receive a notice that the polling location changed. On Election Day this year, I went to “Lenora Church” and I stood in line for 2 hours to vote.

When I got to the front the elections officials scanned my ID and I was told I needed to vote at “Anderson Living Elementary School.” I explained that I voted at this location in 2016 and that I have a special needs daughter and I cannot go to the other polling location, especially not after waiting 2 hours. After requesting a provisional ballot, they allowed me to vote provisionally.


Courtnie

Cobb County

On Election Day, my brother, my father, and I showed up to vote at New Salem Baptist Church around 7 AM. After I inserted the yellow card into the machine, the machine displayed an error message. I brought this error message up to the attention of one of the poll workers, who suggested I try another machine. I did so, and the other machine also displayed an error message.

The poll worker then took my electronic voting card and did not give me another card as I had expected. Instead, a few poll workers ended up discussing the situation, and none of them seemed to know what to do. I even heard one of the poll workers say “it seems she has already voted.” Following this, I was given a provisional ballot, not an emergency ballot, and given extremely confusing, contradictory instructions on how to fill out the ballot. This ordeal also involved my name being misspelled multiple times by a poll-worker, and marks being made by poll workers on my ballot that could not be deciphered. In the meantime, during this experience, my brother and father, who are registered at the same address where I am registered, were able to cast regular ballots.

After turning in my provisional ballot, I attempted to follow up with the Cobb County Board of Elections to make sure that it was counted. I received confusing information from the Cobb Board of Elections, and also was told that “emergency” and “provisional” ballots are the same, which I do not believe to be true.

I expected and believe I was entitled to cast a regular ballot at New Salem Baptist Church. Instead, I was forced to cast a provisional ballot and endure poll workers who did not seem properly informed.


Eunice

DeKalb County

On Election Day I showed up to vote and someone told me I was not on the rolls. I was surprised because I moved to my current address 3 years ago from Macon, GA and when I moved I switched my voter registration to DeKalb County.

They had my family member's name on the list and not mine, and said I could not vote because they sent notice to Macon, GA to verify who I am and they never received anything back so they said I was not active.

I asked why they sent it to Macon when I have an address in Lithonia and they did not answer. I then asked if I could use a provisional ballot and she replied that if I used a provisional ballot it would only be thrown out so I left without being able to vote at all.

I have voted in Dekalb County since living here the past 3 years. I was prevented from voting this year, and they didn’t even let me cast a provisional ballot. I am upset that I was unable to vote.


Rasheikca

Chatham County

In May 2018, I changed my address online at the Secretary of State’s website and received a voter card. When I went to early vote a poll worker pulled me out of line and said I could not vote because I had "felon" on my record. I am not a felon. The Secretary of State’s office could not verify why I was listed as a felon and told the poll worker that I should have received a letter earlier about my status as a felon; I did not receive such a letter.

A poll worker then offered me a provisional ballot, which I completed after two hours at the polling place; I was also not given a receipt upon submitting my provisional ballot.

As of 11/13/18, I still do not know the status of my provisional ballot or if my record as a felon was cleared. I was prevented from casting a regular ballot at Jim R. Miller Park. Instead, I was forced to cast a provisional ballot after inaccurately being designated a felon in the system.


Norman

Cobb County

I am retired military. I was in the military for 24 years and I have voted absentee before, while being stationed overseas. I tried to vote absentee. I filled out all of my forms correctly, and I sent them in on time. But my ballot arrived at the wrong address, and elections officials would not resolve the situation.

I work in South Carolina, so I knew I needed to vote absentee this election cycle. I submitted an application for an absentee ballot well in advance of the election. I designated my residential address as one in Georgia and my mailing address as one in South Carolina to ensure that the ballot was sent to me.

I typed the form myself to ensure there were no mistakes. Later, my wife checked the mail at our home in Georgia and informed me that my ballot had arrived at my address in Georgia, instead of my address in South Carolina. I clearly indicated that the ballot needed to be sent to South Carolina. At that point, I knew that I did not have time to return to Georgia to vote before Election Day, and I hoped to find a resolution for the issue with the Cobb County Board of Elections.

I visited the Cobb County Board of Elections website to file a grievance detailing my issue. On the Saturday after the election, November 10, I received a call back. An elections official informed me that they indeed made a mistake with my ballot and that, unfortunately, I would not be able to vote this cycle. She acknowledged that the elections officials had failed on their end. They committed an error by mailing my ballot to the incorrect location.

She stated that after they receive the absentee ballot application, the ballot issuance process involves three separate people who verify that the information is correct. Through three stages of the process, all three people, tasked with verifying the correct information, failed to ensure that my absentee ballot would be sent to the proper address. The elections official informed me that a resolution would not be possible and that my ballot would not be counted.

As someone who served for decades in our military, the fact that my absentee ballot was mishandled by elections officials is unacceptable. I did everything I needed to do to vote on my end, only to watch as my right to vote was taken away from me this election cycle.


  • Prior to Election Day, I moved from DeKalb County to Fulton County. I updated my address with the Board of Elections through a service known as TurboVote. I went to the polling place for my current address and was denied a ballot. I was told that I was registered at my old address in DeKalb County and needed to travel 30 minutes to a different precinct in order to vote. I did go back to my old polling location and cast my ballot.

    DeKalb County

    Janelle 

  • I left home at 6:30 AM and went to my polling location in Cobb County and waited for one hour, and then I had to leave because of work. I returned at my lunch break at 2:20 PM and remained in line before voting until 5:30. I was allotted only one hour for lunch. As a result, I lost two hours of pay. At the polling place there were six regular voting machines and one handicap machine. I recall clearly that during the 2016 election, there appeared to be twice as many machines. There were long lines at my polling location and I saw people leaving without voting.

    Cobb County

    Tunnizia

  • This year, I requested an absentee ballot to vote by mail, but I never received it. So on Election Day, I showed up at my regular polling place in Cobb County to vote. After checking in with the poll workers, I was informed that I would not be able to vote a regular ballot because I had received an absentee ballot. No one at the polling place mentioned the possibility that I could work cancel my absentee ballot so that I could cast a regular ballot on Election Day, and was instead required to cast a provisional ballot. I called the Cobb County Board of Elections to follow up a few days after Election Day, and was assured by a supervisor that my vote would be counted without requiring me to appear in front of the Board of Elections personally.

    Cobb County

    Lawrence

  • On Election Day, I stood in line for approximately two hours before I was able to fill out my paperwork to get the voting card. I have voted at the same church in Fulton County several times, at least since 2012. It is my designated polling location. When the poll worker scanned my license, she said that I was a registered voter but that I was registered in Gwinnett County. I told her that I have not voted in Gwinnett in 15 years. The poll worker said that I had to go to Gwinnett if I wanted to vote.

    I knew I could vote with a provisional ballot but did not want to because I knew I was registered in Fulton, I could show my car registration as proof of residency. I don’t take voting for granted and did not feel comfortable voting provisionally. I drove to Gwinnett and after waiting 20 minutes in line I was able to vote using the machine. But, I’m not a resident of Gwinnett and it was not fair that I had to go to another county. There were initiatives on the ballot in Fulton County that I wanted to vote on. I should not have to go to another county or feel unsafe casting a provisional ballot.

    I drive a truck for work. I drove all the way to Tulsa, OK, on November 4th, gassed up, and turned around to make sure I was home on the 6th to vote. I drove all night on the 5th to be back on the 6th. After I voted in Gwinnett, they told me to go on the Secretary of State’s website to fix the issue. Nobody gave me more specific instructions like a phone number or email address. I went on the Secretary of State’s website and it’s confusing. I will go on the website now to send over whatever documents I need to show that I have been a resident of Fulton County for 14 years.

    Fulton County

    Dawn 

  • In May 2018, I changed my address online at the Secretary of State’s website and received a voter card. When I went to early vote a poll worker pulled me out of line and said I could not vote because I had "felon" on my record. I am not a felon. The Secretary of State’s office could not verify why I was listed as a felon and told the poll worker that I should have received a letter earlier about my status as a felon; I did not receive such a letter.

    A poll worker then offered me a provisional ballot, which I completed after two hours at the polling place; I was also not given a receipt upon submitting my provisional ballot.

    As of 11/13/18, I still do not know the status of my provisional ballot or if my record as a felon was cleared. I was prevented from casting a regular ballot at Jim R. Miller Park. Instead, I was forced to cast a provisional ballot after inaccurately being designated a felon in the system.

    Cobb County

    Keteria 

  • I arrived at my polling place in Gwinnett County at 6:30 am with my wife and children. There were already long lines. Approximately ten people got through to vote and then the line stopped. A poll worker said they were having problems with the verification machines. The poll worker said they did not have any paper ballots. The poll workers brought in back-up verification machines, but they did not work either. We had to leave because my wife had to get to work.

    We returned at 6:00 pm and the line was much worse than the morning line. I left the line with permission from a voting administrator at approximately 6:50 pm to make a phone call. I made the call at 7:00 pm. I saw around 10-20 people try to get in the building between 7:00 and 7:10 pm. They were turned away and told it was too late. When I was outside, I checked online and found out that a judge had extended the time that my precinct would be open beyond 7:00 pm. I voted around 8:00 pm.

    I noticed when I was voting that a candidate that I thought should have been on my ballot was not on my ballot. His name is Chuck Esstration.

    Gwinnett County

    Jamal

  • Prior to election day, I confirmed my voter registration status twice on the Secretary of State’s website (once myself and once with my girlfriend), and I also received a voter registration card in the mail. When I arrived to my local polling place on election day with my voter registration card in hand, I was told that my name does not appear in the voter registration computer system. I was told I could vote using a provisional ballot, which I did. However, I never received a piece of paper explaining my rights, including how to correct a deficiency and how to check whether my ballot was counted. I did follow-up to correct any deficiency with my registration status and am hopeful that my vote was counted.

    DeKalb County

    Devin

  • I first registered to vote when I was 18 years old, and voted in elections in both 2016 and 2017. In both of those years, I received a precinct card in the mail. Though I never received a precinct card this year, I showed up to vote with my mom at our regular polling place in Fulton County on Election Day. My mom was able to vote within minutes of when we arrived at our polling place. As the poll worker looked for my registration, the only person who came up in the database was another Alexus Clark with a different middle name in Locust Grove. I have never lived in or registered to vote in Locust Grove. The poll worker told me that I wouldn’t be able to vote at all because I wasn’t on the rolls.  I waited at my polling location for two hours trying to determine if I could cast a provisional ballot. At times, poll workers made phone calls and waited on hold for up to 30 minutes to inquire about my voter registration, and I felt as though the poll workers doubted my story from their repeated questions. Ultimately, I had to leave in order to go to class. So I left without being able to cast a ballot, provisional or otherwise. When I got home later, I looked up the information on the Secretary of State’s My Voter Page website. If the poll worker was correct in believing that this other Alexus Clark was in Locust Grove, then I knew she would've had the same birthdate and name as me, but would live in Henry County. On that page, I saw that she had registered on April 4, 2018. So it seemed like the Secretary of State had mixed me up with this other Alexus Clark and somehow written over or deleted my voter registration. When I tried looking up my name and birthdate in Fulton County, the SOS MVP page showed that my registration was unable to be located. I was confused about how this could have happened because we live in different counties and we would have different social security numbers. My right to vote was taken away from me.

    Fulton County

    Alexus

  • I voted early at the Dacula Park Activity Building, where I went to a voting machine booth and pressed the screen to select Stacey Abrams for governor. The machine changed my selection to Brian Kemp. I noticed immediately and changed my selection back to Stacey Abrams. I made the rest of my selections but when I did a final review of all of my selections, I saw that the machine was showing Brian Kemp again. So I went back and again selected Stacey Abrams. But again, for the third time, the machine changed my selection to Brian Kemp. So for the third time I corrected my selection back to Stacey Abrams. After my third correction, the voting machine finally showed Stacey Abrams as my selection, and I was able to cast a correct ballot.
    I was aware that machines could switch votes, having been through a similar experience in Georgia, so I was watchful. But others who did not have my previous experience could easily have cast their ballot without realizing the machine had changed their vote to the wrong candidate.

    Gwinnett County

    Allison

  • I attend Howard University in Washington D.C. I received my absentee ballot around October 5, and sent it in a few weeks later, probably around October 15. I signed the ballot every place there was an X. Then, I checked the Secretary of State’s My Voter Page website every day. My ballot was rejected for “Insufficient Oath Information. I tried to continuously follow up with the Board of Elections, but they have just taken my information down and do not do any follow-up with my case.

    Dekalb County

    Rachel

  • On November 6, 2018, I I took my 92-year-old grandmother, Christine, to vote at her regular polling place in Fulton County. My grandmother has lived in the Historic West End of Atlanta since 1968 and voted at the same polling place for the past 25 years. This year is the fiftieth anniversary of her voting from the Historic West End. On the morning of election day, my mother and I went to my grandmother’s home to pick her up and to go vote. Often when I pick my grandmother up, she is not ready and I have to wait for her to finish getting dressed. Not on election day. When we arrived, she was up and ready to go, only needing help with her shoes.

    She was excited. She grew up as a first cousin to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (my grandmother’s mother was Dr. King Sr.’s half sister) and she well-understood the struggle for civil rights and voting rights, in particular. Voting has always been of paramount importance to my grandmother and to the rest of our family. And, my grandmother certainly understood the significance of casting her vote for the first African American woman to run for Governor in the State of Georgia.

    Though she is an active voter who cast her ballot in 2016 and in this year’s primary, her registration could not be found in the database on Election Day this November. When the poll worker was unable to find her registration, we were initially told she would not be allowed to vote – even with a provisional ballot. The poll workers seemed confused about the process, so I turned to the Democratic Party of Georgia’s Voter Protection Hotline on my grandmother’s behalf. After nearly 2.5 hours, my grandmother was finally given a provisional ballot, yet we were never told about the necessary steps we might need to take in order to “cure” the provisional ballot and see her vote counted. Instead, the poll workers just thanked her and gave her a sticker.

    Fulton County

    Jessica

  • I work as an attorney in Atlanta. On Election Day, I went to Mary Lin Elementary School in Dekalb County around 8:00 AM. There, I was not permitted to cast a regular ballot on a voting machine. Instead, I was told that I had to cast a provisional ballot because the system showed that I was supposed to vote in Morningside, which is in Fulton County. I have not lived in Morningside since 1993, but when I moved to DeKalb County, I tried to change my voter address several times, but it never works. Every time I show up at Mary Lin to vote, I am told that I am still supposed to vote in Morningside. My family votes at Mary Lin with no problems, but I was forced to cast a provisional ballot.

    DeKalb County

    Jim

  • On Election Day, I showed up to vote at my regular polling location in DeKalb County. When I checked in, the poll worker said that my name was not in the system and they could not find me. They offered me a provisional ballot, but I did not want to do this because I knew I was a registered voter. The poll workers told me that I had to go to Memorial Drive and bring my voter registration card. Luckily, I had my voter registration so I went to the Memorial Drive location.

    Using my voter registration number, they found out that they had assigned my voter registration number to someone in Fulton County. It was almost as if I had never been registered to vote. They wouldn’t have been able to figure this out if I hadn't happened to have my voter registration card on me. The person at Memorial Drive had to re-add me as a “Supplemental voter”. They wrote my name down on a piece of paper and said that they would add later on as a “numbered voter”. I voted using the machine and the card with the piece of paper with my name on it attached to it.

    The person at Memorial Drive said this mistake was caused by human error and this happens all the time. I have never lived in Fulton County. All my documents have always been at one address in DeKalb, and I did nothing to change my voter registration. But it changed anyway. I was forced to vote as a “supplemental voter” instead of casting a regular ballot, through no fault of my own, because my voter registration number was assigned to someone else.

    DeKalb County

    Antione

  • I’ve always voted at the same church in DeKalb County in all previous elections. When I went to vote on Election Day, I showed the poll workers my Georgia’s driver’s license and they said I needed to be at a different poll because my address on my driver’s license did not match my voter registration address. I went online and showed them my polling location listed online was the one I was currently at. However, their system stated differently -- that I had to be somewhere in Rockbridge. I ended up voting with a provisional ballot. They didn’t give me instructions on how to follow-up and cure it; instead, I saw on TV that I had to cure my ballot, so I called the number shown to do so.

    DeKalb County

    Gloria

  • I have strongly held political views about a number of different topics, so it is important for me to participate in our political process and to vote. I have never voted absentee before, but I work odd hours for a financial technology company and knew that I would not necessarily have the time to go vote in person during this election season. Therefore, I requested an absentee ballot to allow me to vote by mail. Records reflect that my request was received on September 28, and that the ballot was issued on October 1. I sent the ballot back via the U.S. Postal Service in mid to late October, and trusted that this was plenty of time for my ballot to be received. Sometime around Election Day, I decided to check online to confirm that my ballot had been received and accepted. I was surprised to see that there was no record of my ballot. By the time I learned that my ballot had never been received, I did not have time to vote in person. I was upset that my vote was not registered and counted, especially because I now know the results of the election were so close.

    DeKalb County

    Colin

  • This year, I helped my sister submit an application for an absentee ballot to the DeKalb County Board of Elections, which she never received. Sadly, my sister was unable to vote. We received the absentee application request for my sister in the mail. In mid-October, well before Election Day or the deadline for submitting absentee ballots, I submitted the request for an absentee ballot on behalf of my sister, who has a disability.

    We never received the absentee ballot, which meant my sister was not able to vote. My sister voted in 2016; she stood in line but the lines were so long and with her disability, it made absentee voting the right thing to do. Unfortunately, my sister was deprived of her right to vote after never receiving her absentee ballot.

    DeKalb County

    Betty

  • My sister and I sent in the application for a vote by mail ballot the day before it was due but we did not receive our absentee ballot before election day. On Election Day, we went to our designated polling location in Cobb County and we were sent to the provisional ballot line since we had requested an absentee ballot. The provisional line took an additional 30-40 minutes longer than the regular line and there were only 3 people in line in front of me. I cast a provisional ballot and was not permitted to vote on a voting machine. We both received our absentee ballots the day after Election Day.

    Cobb County

    Elan

  • Several months ago, I found an envelope in the mail, and it was a piece of paper saying that I could fill it out, sign it, and send it back, and an absentee ballot would be sent to me for the November 6, 2018, General Election. I was going to complete the form and send it back, but I actually ended up spilling coffee on the paper, so I went online to do a request for an absentee ballot. I printed out the request, and I both mailed and e-mailed it to the addresses provided on the request.

    I should backup and explain why I needed to request an absentee ballot in the first instance. I am a single parent and the sole care provider for my nonverbal 23-year-old son with Autism Spectrum Disorder and a seizure disorder. We are always together and at home all of the time. While I have occasionally in past elections made prior arrangements with someone to come to the house and be with my son while I go vote, that was not an option for this election. Recently, his seizures have peaked, so I’m not leaving him with anyone, and I’m certainly not going to drag him to the polls and take him into a stressful environment—regardless if it were early voting or on November 6, 2018. Accordingly, absentee voting was my only option for the November 6, 2018, election.

    After I had both emailed and mailed my request for an absentee ballot, I waited and waited but nothing ever came. Finally, with about a week left until the election—it was either October 25 or October 26—I called a number—I’m not sure if it was a Cobb County line or a Stacey Abrams line—but they told me to sit tight because my absentee ballot was shown as being issued on October 18, 2018.

    Finally, the absentee ballot did come. I spent a lot of time with my ballot: I looked up every amendment, and then I even looked up which candidates were supporting each amendment. Because I would have to take breaks from my research to help my son with something, it took me at least three to four hours to fully research and complete my ballot.

    On October 29, 2018, I had everything ready to go. I even had a friend go pick up stamps for me, because although I had one stamp, you needed two stamps to mail the ballot. A friend picked up my ballot and took it to the mailbox at the U.S. Postal Service in Marietta, GA. My friend actually took a picture of herself putting my ballot into the mailbox. She knew how important it was to me that my vote was mailed out.

    The next day, on October 30, 2018, I checked the Georgia My Voter Page to see the status of my ballot. I know it was a little early given that I had just mailed it the day before, but I was excited about my vote. Of course, given that it was only a day later, there was nothing listed after the “Received” line on the Georgia My Voter Page. But then, I continued checking the Georgia My Voter Page every day thereafter, and there was never any change. The “Received” line (and the “Status” and “Reason” lines all remained blank).

    I did call the voter hotline number twice to check on my status. The first time, the person said to just give it some time because Cobb County is slow; the second time, they told me the same thing. I didn’t call Cobb County because, honestly, I just don’t trust them.

    I continued to check the status of my absentee ballot on the Georgia My Voter Page every day through the week of the election, and it never showed that it was received. And as of November 14, 2018, it still is showing no date of receipt for my absentee ballot. I just don’t know what happened to it. It’s out there somewhere. It had a return label on it, but I haven’t received it back.

    So I voted in this election, and I voted for Stacey Abrams, but as far as I know, my vote was never counted. Particularly given how deeply I feel about the candidates, and how much effort I invested into making sure my vote was counted, I feel utterly letdown and disappointed that I was prevented from doing my part to help Stacey.

    Cobb County

    Karen

  • I registered to vote online in early October 2018. When I registered to vote, I was given a reference identification number.  I took a screenshot of the confirmation page after I registered to vote. On Election Day, I went to my local polling place in Gwinnett County to vote. When I got there, the poll workers told me that I was not registered to vote and that they could not even give me a provisional ballot. I wanted to know why I wasn’t being allowed to vote when I had registered online, and why I was not being given a provisional ballot.  

    They told me to have a seat while they checked on the status of my registration over the phone.  When they told me again I was not registered, I asked to call and speak to someone myself. I really did not want to leave without voting.  I spoke to a lady on the phone who said that she was not sure why my registration had not showed up, and that maybe the system had not been updated just yet. She told me to check with the registrar’s office.  I told her that I wanted to file a formal complaint because I was not able to vote and because no one would even provide me with a provisional ballot. Altogether, I was at the polling place for over an hour.

    After I left the polling place, I filed a complaint with the Secretary of State to allege that my rights had been violated as an African-American woman. Being able to vote in the midterm elections, including voting for governor, was very important to me. I was really upset that I could not vote even after registering online and having what appeared to me to be a confirmation number to show that I was registered. I did not want to leave the polling place without even getting a provisional ballot, which is why I pushed back so hard to have someone identify for me why I was not being allowed to vote.  I am still upset that I was not able to cast my vote in this election.

    Gwinnett County

    Tyra

  • I am in the military. I went to vote early in person around Nov 1st in Gwinnett County where I am registered to vote. When I arrived, I was told by a poll worker I would not be able to vote because I had a pending absentee ballot. I pressed that I had never requested an absentee ballot for this general election. The poll worker checked and the absentee ballot on my record was for January 2018, presumably from the primary elections, for which I had requested an absentee ballot but had not returned. I was given some paperwork, one of those was to rescind my absentee ballot, and then I was allowed to vote using an electronic machine.

    Gwinnett County

    Jacob 

  • On Election Day, I went to the Voter Registration building to vote. I arrived at approximately 6:30 p.m. because I had to go pick-up my child at daycare first. I was told by the employees at the voter registration building this is where I could go for Early Voting, but not Election Day.

    The employee at the voter registration office offered to use my ID to pull the location where I should vote. He told me to go to the Shiloh Early Education Center. The GPS told me that the place didn’t exist, but I happened to see the signs on the road that said where to go to vote. I arrived at the Shiloh Education Center at approximately 6:45 p.m.

    I filled out the card as directed by the poll worker. She said to fill out the highlighted section (on the left) but not the right. I clarified whether I needed to provide my address (on the right side of the card) and the poll worker said, “Oh I forgot to ask for that!” I then went to the next table where I gave a different poll worker the the white card I filled out along with my ID.

    The poll worker scanned my ID and she said: “I’ve never seen this before.” She told me, “It says you are not a US Citizen.” I was born in Virginia and have voted in Georgia since I was 18 years old. I am 36. This has never happened to me before. The last time I voted was in 2012.

    The poll worker called over another poll worker to look at what she was seeing on the screen. He had never seen it before, either. He made a phone call to the voter registration building. I know this because, later, when I went there, the woman recognized me and addressed me as Ms. Carter.

    I offered the poll workers my ID and said that I had my social security card with me. The poll worker at the table thought that the Social Security card should work and then again spoke with the other poll worker. The other poll worker said, “that just has numbers on it, it won’t work.”

    I offered to get my birth certificate from home, though I wasn’t sure I could make it home and back in time. I’m fairly new to Henry County. The other poll worker said to go back to the voter registration office again and added, “I’m surprised they didn’t catch this when you were there earlier.”

     

    I went back to the voter registration office. The employee used the information off my driver’s license and the last four digits of my Social Security Number. She then told me I needed to get this issue fixed before next election. It was exactly 7 p.m. when I left the voter registration office.

    I was shocked and I didn’t even know where to begin to fix this to prove that I’m a citizen. I was not able to vote. Nobody offered me a provisional ballot and I do not know anything about provisional ballots.

    Henry County

    Kia 

  • I was a concerned citizen observer at the Pittman Recreational Center on Election Day. I observed voting for 13 hours that day, from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. The Pittman polling center was a combined polling place. I attend school in Massachusetts, and therefore needed to vote absentee this cycle. In fact, as October set in, my mother sent me regular reminders to request my absentee ballot and make my voice heard.  I visited the Secretary of State’s website, printed out a form labeled ‘Application for Official Absentee Ballot,’ filled in the required boxes, and sent the ballot request to the email address listed for Fayette County’s Election Office. Within a few hours, I received confirmation that my application had been received for processing and thought that was that. Then I waited for my ballot to arrive. When my absentee ballot did arrive by mail, due to academic obligations including midterm exams, lab work, and research papers, I had to wait until one week before Election Day to sit down with the ballot. When I opened the neatly sealed white envelope, instead of a long strip of folder paper, dotted with names of state and county candidates, I found only a single question, marked for my hometown of Peachtree City, regarding the Sunday ban on the sale of alcohol. I rechecked the envelope for the missing pages. Finding nothing, I compared my emailed application to my college-aged brother’s, and they were exactly the same. Troubled, but not suspicious, I decided that the ballot must have been split into two parts. I mailed what I thought was the ‘first’ ballot on November 4, and waited patiently for a ‘second’ ballot. A second ballot did not arrive. I try to vote in every election—to not be a part of one so critical felt almost shameful. I did what I needed to do, as a Georgia citizen, requesting an absentee ballot well-ahead of time. I received nothing close to a complete ballot. My right to vote was taken away from me.

    Fayette County

    Marjorie

  • Approximately two weeks prior to the start of early voting, I viewed the Secretary of State’s website to confirm that my name and residence address were correct so that I could vote early and without issue. When I attempted to early vote in Fulton County, I was told that my address in the voter registration computer system was different than the address listed on my driver’s license. For some reason, the voter registration computer system listed an address from eight years prior.  This was concerning to me because I had recently confirmed my name and residence address on the Secretary of State’s website prior to attempting to vote. I declined to early vote on this day. I went home and, again, viewed the Secretary of State’s website and discovered that someone had changed my address. On Election Day, I went to my local polling place to vote and was told that I had already voted by absentee ballot using my eight-year old address, which was not true. On Election Day, I voted using a provisional ballot but never received a piece of paper explaining my rights, including how to correct a deficiency and how to check whether my ballot was counted. I am uncertain whether my vote was ever counted.

    Fulton County

    Chris

  • On Election Day, I left home and drove directly to my polling place, Sagamore Hills Elementary, arriving at 6:50 AM. After waiting more than 45 minutes, the poll workers scanned my license and said that I was not registered to vote. I told them that I was and actually pulled out my cell phone to show them the GA voter registration site where I entered my information and showed them the MVP screen. They then stated that the problem was that my registration was with my last name as “del Rio” while in my driver’s license my last name was “delrio” (nospace) and that there was not a match. I told them then that the problem was the GA DMV did not allow a space in the last name. I also told them that I thought the exact match ruling had been struck down. The volunteer doing the registration told me she was going to check with someone else and when she returned, told me “for this time we will allow you to vote.”
    While I was ultimately able to cast my vote, it was a frustrating experience and I can only imagine the powerlessness that others less fortunate than I may have felt as they attempted to exercise a fundamental American right.

    Dekalb County

    Carlos

  • My husband and I voted early in person together on October 19th in Cobb County, where we have lived for the last six years. As I cast my ballot, my voting machine repeatedly changed my choice to candidates I did not choose. When I pressed my choice for Governor, the selection automatically changed to the person I didn’t choose. I tried to hit it again and it reflected the same person again -- not the person I selected. On the third time, it worked and selected the person I wanted to vote for.

    After making all my selections, I double checked to make sure my vote was actually my vote as intended. I do not know if it worked in the end. The same thing happened when I voted in the presidential election in 2016. But this year, I was alarmed that it took three whole tries to get my vote right.

    Cobb County

    Claudine

  • Before Election Day, I updated my driver’s license online with a permanent address and mailing address listed. On Election Day, I went to vote at the polling location on my voter registration card. Upon arrival, a female poll worker was unable to locate my name on the rolls.

    I showed them my voter registration card that indicated I was at the right location. The poll worker contacted a poll worker at a different precinct who said they used my permanent address for my polling location, not my mailing address; although my voter registration card was delivered to my mailing address.

    They decided that I needed to cast a provisional ballot.

    Cobb County

    Tangerlyn

  • I voted early at the Dacula Park Activity Building, where I went to a voting machine booth and pressed the screen to select Stacey Abrams for governor. The machine changed my selection to Brian Kemp. I noticed immediately and changed my selection back to Stacey Abrams. I made the rest of my selections but when I did a final review of all of my selections, I saw that the machine was showing Brian Kemp again. So I went back and again selected Stacey Abrams. But again, for the third time, the machine changed my selection to Brian Kemp. So for the third time I corrected my selection back to Stacey Abrams. After my third correction, the voting machine finally showed Stacey Abrams as my selection, and I was able to cast a correct ballot.
    I was aware that machines could switch votes, having been through a similar experience in Georgia, so I was watchful. But others who did not have my previous experience could easily have cast their ballot without realizing the machine had changed their vote to the wrong candidate.

    Gwinnett County

    Allison

  • I changed my voter registration in September 2018 to my current residence address, and verified this change on the Georgia Secretary of State’s “My Voter” page. On Election Day, November 6, 2018, I showed up to vote at my polling location around 6 PM. After waiting around 50 minutes, my driver’s license was scanned and I was informed by a poll worker that I was not registered at my current address. Instead I was still registered at my previous address. I tried to show the poll workers on my phone that I was indeed registered at Faith Baptist Temple, to no avail. I was prevented from casting a regular ballot at the Faith Baptist Temple. Instead, I was forced to cast a provisional ballot.

    Cobb County

    Eboni

  • I am a resident of Cobb County and have voted at Crossview Baptist Church for the past ten years. That includes the 2018 Democratic Primary Election in Georgia. I made no changes to my voter registration prior to the 2018 Georgia General Election. On Election Day, November 6, 2018, my daughter Annette and I showed up to vote at Crossview Baptist Church around 3 PM. After checking in with a poll worker, I was informed that I was not registered at my current address and that my precinct was on Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Atlanta. I was told that I would have to travel there in order to cast a regular ballot. I tried to explain that I had been voting at the Crossview Baptist Church for a decade, but the poll workers would still not allow me to cast a regular ballot. My family was very upset. My daughter Annette was able to cast a regular ballot, but I was not. I was forced to cast a provisional ballot.

    Cobb County

    Christine

  • I am an experienced attorney and I was a poll watcher at IGL BAUTISTA NUEVA JERUSALEN on Election Day. The lines were long at this location and wait times were 1-2 hours all day. I witnessed many issues. I witnessed voters leave the line and abandon voting because they ran out of time, and also observed others who walked up to the line and left when they realized how long the line was. I witnessed other voters who were turned away and not permitted to vote when the poll workers could not locate the voter’s registration. Those voters were not given a provisional ballot unless they asked for one. One woman was told she was not registered to vote despite having voted in the past, including 2012. On several occasions I heard a poll worker tell a voter that the address the voter provided did not match the one in the computer. The poll workers stopped the voting process every hour to do a vote count. A few voters were told that state records showed that they had already voted when they had not.

    Gwinnett County

    Andrea

  • I voted by absentee ballot in the last two presidential elections and I am therefore familiar with how the process works. I was working out of town in Texas and looking forward to voting in the midterms, so I requested an absentee ballot in ample time. I received and executed my absentee ballot and returned it to DeKalb County, believing that I had done everything required in order to have my vote count. On November 5, the day before the election and while I was out of town in Texas, I received a communication from DeKalb County saying my ballot had been rejected because the oath of the elector was incomplete. I immediately sent a fax to the Manager of Absentee Ballots in DeKalb requesting a copy of the oath and an explanation of what was wrong with my submission. I could not get any information on how to cure the deficiency. I am seriously frustrated at the apparent fact that my ballot has not been counted. I have previously voted by absentee ballot without any problem. I have a college education and fully understand the requirements and instructions for completing an absentee ballot. If I made a mistake, I accept the consequences but, based on my prior experience, I seriously doubt that I am at fault.

    DeKalb County

    Isaac

  • Well before Election Day, I went on-line to voter.org to check my registration status and that of my husband and confirmed that we were both registered at our current address. On Election Day, my husband and I took our eight-year old son and my service dog with us to vote at Mill Creek Middle School. My husband presented his ID, received his yellow ballot card and entered a voting booth. When I presented my ID, however, I was told that my address on file was 112 Little River Drive and that I would not be allowed to vote at that precinct. They told me I had to go to a different precinct. I have never lived at 112 Little River Drive, and had never heard of Little River Drive. I was also never offered the opportunity to cast a provisional ballot at Mill Creek Middle School, so my husband, my son, and my dog went to the other precinct. We waited at least 30 minutes. Ultimately, I was able to cast my vote but I felt like there were impediments at every turn including the inexplicable changing of my address.

    Cherokee County

    Delaney